For the public

Greens and Vegetables for Herbivorous Reptiles

Here are recommended vegetables and greens for reptile diets. 
 
Choose a variety of the follow to feed daily -
Spring Mix, Field greens,  Dandelion greens, Collard greens, Endive, Escarole, Mustard Greens, Squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, scallop, spaghetti, summer), and Turnip greens. Also  Shrubs/Cultivated plants (hibiscus, cape honeysuckle, mulberry, strawberry bush, grape leaves, viola, violet, pansies, poppy, petunia, geraniums, etc.), Alfalfa (plants), Cactus pad/leaf (prickly pear), and Lettuce (red leaf, romaine)
 

Bearded Dragon Nutrition

Proper nutrition is a very important part of caring for your bearded dragon. Bearded dragons are omnivores, meaning they eat a combination of both prey items and plants. Studies in Australia of wild adult bearded dragons show the eat approximately 90% plants and only 10% prey items and juveniles each equal amounts of each. Similar percentages should be attempted in pet bearded dragons using this feeding guide. 

Encephalitozoonosis (E. cuniculi)

Encephalitozoon cuniculi (ECUN) is a microsporidium parasite related to fungi. Rabbits can either become infected while they develop within their mother's uterus or by either ingesting or inhaling spores passed in the urine or feces from rabbits already carrying the disease. Ingested spores pass through the walls of the intestine into the blood where they then travel to other areas of the body. In most rabbits,the disease spreads onward to the kidneys, eye and brain.

Atadenovirus in Bearded Dragons

Atadenovirus is a viral infection most commonly seen in bearded dragons. It can cause inflammation of the digestive system, liver, kidneys, and nervous tissue as well as suppress their immune system. Common symptoms are loss of appetite and lethargy. Because it can affect the immune systems ability to fight infections, some may have problems recovering from other infections and illness or have recurrent problems with parasites. In rarer cases where the virus infects nervous tissue it may cause difficulty walking, controlling the limbs, or "star gazing" (constantly looking upward). 

Basic Care: Golden Greek Tortoise

Several species have been referred to as Golden Greek Tortoises, none actually originating from Greece at all. The two most commonly seen species in the pet trade are Testudo terrestris and Testudo floweri, the former probably being the most common of the two. The natural range of T. terrestris is Northern Iraq to Turkey and Syria. Whereas T. floweri has a far more limited natural range, found only along a narrow strip of land along the coasts of Israel and Lebanon and possibly as far west as Egypt in the Sinai. 
Both species are found in moderate to hot arid climates and both may remain fairly active late into the winter, aestivating partially submerged into shallow pits or burrows, retreating for brumation only during the coldest times of the year. 
The natural diet of both species is similar to that of other Greek tortoises (T. graeca) consisting of edible weeds, thistles and vegetative debris. 

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