Other Birds

Other Birds

Aside from the most common species of birds, we also see  other birds ranging from canaries and finches, doves and pigeons, to pet turkeys and toucans!  If you are not sure if we provide services for your pet bird, please call us and ask.  

Doves: Raising Babies

Maintain the squab at a temperature of 95.0 to 98°F.  A thermometer should be used.  A small bowl of water may be needed to provide enough humidity.  There are many good quality squab raising formulas available commercially and I recommend having some on hand at all times if you want to raise doves. Roudybush's Squab Formula works well (see www.roudybush.com).  Harrison's Neonatal Formula can be used if you can't get a dove-specific hand-feeding formula.

Doves: Diets

Many ringneck doves do well on a good wild bird seed mix or small parrot seed mix (i.e., a mix of millet, hemp, milo, wheat, and canary seed), this may) that is supplemented with fresh chopped greens, soft (cooked) orange to yellow vegetables (e.g., squash, sweet potato, etc.), and pieces of whole grain bread.  I recommend mixing in Harrison's High Potency Bird Mash to the seed to help enhance their nutritional value.  Additional food treats can include hard boiled egg (shell and all!), cooked beans, sprouted beans, and even small bits of cottage cheese.  A shallow dish of calcium should be

Trauma

Birds can injure themselves quite easily in the typical household.  It is important to "bird proof" your home so that you lessen the chance of serious accidents.

Sinus Infections

Birds have a very complicated sinus system (a part of the respiratory tract) with lots of interconnecting air pockets that can readily get infected.  Infections can start in one site and move through the sinus system to attack most areas of the skull. A severe infection means that many affected birds will die without treatment.

Scaly Skin

Scaley skin is a common problem in captive birds.  On the feet the skin may appear as a white powdery to flakey substance, or develop a thick build-up of dry yellow material.  On the body beneath the feathers you may see a spiderweb of dry skin, sometimes with patches of yellow or tan crusts.  Scaley skin can be caused by a variety of problems.  An imbalanced, particularly one that is low in vitamin A or ones that have an imbalance of

At Home Care for Sick Birds

When a bird is very ill, it is often recommended that a “hospital cage” be created at home to provide an optimal environment for recovery. It is best to have a designated cage for this before an illness occurs in order to be well prepared. Your veterinarian will make specific recommendations for you based on your individual birds problem but the following information is often adequate for most basic at home hospital cages.

Endoscopy for Avian Patients

Endoscopes are small "telescopes" that are used to have a look at the internal organs of an animal. Just as a veterinarian does a thorough physical examination of the outside of the body, the endoscope allows a veterinarian to do the same sort of examination of the bird's internal organs to assess their health.  This is extremely helpful to determine an underlying cause for many illnesses that elude detection through bloodwork and other routine diagnostic labwork.

Bird Emergencies

If your bird is not acting right or appears injured and you are unsure of the severity of the condition, it is always best to contact us immediately. We are able to accommodate emergencies during regular business hours.

If we are closed, we recommend using the emergency animal clinic located at 86 W. Juniper Avenue (just off of Gilbert Road south of Guadalupe Road).  Their phone number is 480-497-0222.  While this clinic is not an exclusive exotic pet practice, the doctors and staff are capable of providing emergency care for your pet until we are open.

Syringes - How Much Medication Is Needed?

Pets may be sent home with liquid medications.  An oral liquid medication must be given by mouth to be effective.  An injectable liquid medication must be given by injection beneath the skin to be useful.  Some injectable medications require that the medication is inserted into the muscle to be most effective.  It is important that you understand how to read the syringes that are sent home so your pet gets the proper amount of medication at each dose.

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